DNA Workshops at OGS Conference 2018

Your favorite Blueberry loving Genetic Genealogist will be presenting Workshops on Friday June 1st at the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference in Guelph, Ontario.

Friday Afternoon

DNA and the Global Family Tree

DNA and adding your DNA connections to a Global family tree. Attempting to breakdown brickwalls using DNA can be daunting. Which “Global” family Trees are truly capable of connecting you to your DNA matches? Which is best for the kind of DNA test taken? How do each of the Global Family Tree’s propagate DNA results? How do you find matches and make connections on these Trees? Working across all DNA testing Companies and all Global Family Tree Sites we will look at which “Global” family trees work best for DNA. Via hands on work, participants will work through the process of making DNA connections and help to get their DNA Global Family Tree connections working for them. – Computer Skills are essential to this workshop.

Genetic Genealogy is the Ultimate Crowd Source Project

It’s nothing near a stretch to say that Genetic Genealogy is the Ultimate Crowd Source Project. Genetic Genealogists are often called citizen scientists. To say someone is a citizen scientist means, in my book, that they, them, you and me, us are not associated with multi million dollar corporations in any financial way.

We work to share our work. It’s the new paradigm in Genealogy – collaboration.

Since we are working to share our work and further our research together, we have worked out ways to do that. Many of us have our own blogs. Many of us have Facebook pages or even Facebook groups to share. One great case in point is Blaine Bettinger’s Genetic Genealogy Tips & Techniques group which has over 40,000 members. 40 thousand people sharing and posting and discussing Genetic Genealogy – crowd sourcing.

GEDmatch stands out as one of the greatest crowd sourced tools in the Genealogy community, offering a database of autosomal and X DNA test results and tools to do analysis and matching. It’s growing rapidly. This growth in new members has occurred since the release of information that the GEDmatch database was used to help identify a man who turned out to be California’s most prolific and elusive serial rapist and murderer. The case has caused an uproar in the Genealogy community with people publicly stating that they will remove their data from this important database because of it’s use in a criminal investigation. But still there is that growth. I certainly have noticed it in the higher count of people on GEDmatch when I login. Good.

Family Search is crowd sourced. Geni is, for the most part, crowd sourced- if you can work around the the many annoying paywalls. We Relate is Crowd sourced.  Then there is the ultimate crowd sourced Global Family Tree, WikiTree, with it’s…well with it’s everything.

Recent Crowd Source Losses

Three significant crowd sourced projects closed their shutters this week. Which speaks to growing concerns for privacy and the GDPR (if you have been under the proverbial rock – it’s the General Data Protection Regulations for the EU and UK. Google it. I am so disgusted with it’s fall out I don’t even want to link to it). I know this new regulation will eventually make crowd sourcing better, but it’s a huge hit to lose Y-Search, mitoSearch and World Families. 

Thank you and goodbye to you three. I have often been in your data working to solve adoption cases or help a family find their true surname or build a clients sense of family or connect my family to the rest of my family tree through DNA.

Moving “onward and upward”

The “onward and upward” quote is something I see often in Chris Whitten’s (WikiTree’s, WikiTreer-In-Chief) emails and posts to WikiTree. We as a community will move on. Moving on means that we need to do some things to protect our databases from extinction. And we will.

Crowd Sourcing

Crowd sourcing will be better with tighter controls on privacy and a mind to even more openness. Yes I said it, privacy and openness. I will say it again and I will follow that advice as I work on my family and friends and clients families on my favorite crowd sourced project (which has taken incredible steps to protect itself and it’s community of crowd sourcing and enthusiastic genealogists) WikiTree.

I will also continue to use and support and lecture about other crowd sourced ventures like GEDmatch.

I love being in this incredible crowd sourced community.

Off to Kitchener

I am off to Kitchener in the morning and I have been looking forward to this trip for so many reasons that I thought you might like me to outline a few of them.

  1. The Kitchener Public Library Fair isn’t your regular old run of the mill Library Genealogy thing. This library system serves a densely populated part of Ontario and their Genealogy Fair garners crowds with varying degrees of Genealogy knowledge, from beginner to expert and top-notch speakers from the Genealogy field. I get to be a part of it and that is just so cool!
  2. Sharing my passion, Genetic Genealogy, as the Keynote speaker.  The Power of DNA is the message. This message will wrap itself nicely around the DNA theme of this years fair. There will be a small guest appearance by my Grandfather during the presentation too. All the way from the hills and foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains of South Carolina. I kid you not.
  3. Riding a train for the first time in my life to Kitchener. Yes. I know. Of course I have ridden the subway in major cities and yes I have ridden the Monorail at Disney, but never a train. My poor spousal unit is getting peppered with all sorts of questions from me, “How will I know which car is car #4?”, What do I do with my luggage?”, “Where are the bathrooms?”, “How do I find lunch?” and “Do they have footrests?” I will be a wide-eyed Harry Potter on his first ride to Hogwarts (thanks to Sheila at KPL for making my travel arrangements!).

Everything always happens at the same time for me!

If traveling by train for the first time in my life and speaking at such a great event weren’t enough? The WikiTree Clean-A-Thon is this weekend. Not only do I get to speak, share my granddad and ride a train, I get to help clean-up Wikitree Profiles and do Video Hangouts with fellow WikiTreers  while traveling and when I get home.

Another amazingly busy Weekend in the offing! Come see me, or watch for me hanging my head out the train window like a very happy puppy, tongue flapping, ears blowing back and wearing the biggest grin on earth. You can also see me hanging out with other WikiTreers every four hours starting at midnight on Friday and running through Midnight on Tuesday morning during the Clean-A-Thon (NO! Not at 4am and not during the KPL Genealogy Fair).

 

 

New GEDmatch X-chromosome comparison links at WikiTree

From WikiTreer-in-Chief, Chris Whitten comes this great announcement about new GEDmatch X-chromosome comparison links at WikiTree.

“Hi WikiTreers,

We just took another small step forward in our collaboration with GEDmatch.com.

As most of you know, you can click directly to view one-to-one autosomal test comparisons on GEDmatch from WikiTree profile pages and DNA Ancestor Confirmation Aid pages. You can also do Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA comparisons through Ysearch and MitoSearch “[compare]” links on WikiTree.

One thing we haven’t had until now is easy X-chromosome comparison links. X comparisons can be especially powerful for genealogy because there is a more limited inheritance pattern on the X than the autosome and almost everyone who has taken an autosomal DNA test (all 10 or 12 million of us!) has X chromosome test results too. There is a lot of untapped potential for DNA confirmation using X matches.

Here’s an example of how you might use this. Look on your DNA Ancestors page — this is the “DNA” link on the pull-down menu that starts with your WikiTree ID — and scroll to the X Chromosome section. These are the ancestors from whom you inherited your X DNA. Choose one of the distant ones and click the DNA Descendants icon  next to their name.

On your ancestor’s DNA Descendants page scroll to the X Chromosome section. These are the descendants — yourself and your cousins — who are likely to match each other on the X. If more than one of you are on GEDmatch you can click the “[compare]” links to see whether you match as you would expect.

Here are a couple examples of DNA Descendants pages where you can see the new GEDmatch comparison links:

Maybe a more informed genetic genealogist will follow up here with advice on doing the actual DNA confirmations, or with other ideas for using this new feature.

Onward and upward,

Chris

P.S. A big thank you to John Olson, Curtis Rogers, and our other friends at GEDmatch for enabling us to create these links. Thank you to Blaine Bettinger for his early and ongoing evangelism for X chromosome usage. (We used Blaine’s charts to create our XDNA ancestor and descendant pages.) And thank you to Mags Gaulden, Kay Wilson and the other DNA Project members for their leadership on these subjects, most especially — especially — thank you to Peter Roberts, who suggested this feature and helped it all come together, as he has with many of our DNA features.”

This is just great Chris (and Peter),

X-DNA is often overlooked, but can be a powerful tool because it’s inheritance is very specific. Click on your DNA link as Chris suggested and look at how this sex chromosome is inherited.

For a female:

  • From your Dad and his Mother.
  • From your Mother and her parents

For a Male:

  • From your Mother and her parents

It’s so specific. The Confirmation Citation is really informative too:

* Maternal relationship is confirmed by a 108.0 cM X chromosome match between John Kingman GEDmatch T782948 and his second cousin once removed Kelly Miller GEDmatch A721343. Their MCRA is Charles Cyrus Babst.

Take some time to look at some of those X-Matches WikiTree has posted for you. You might get a pleasant surprise.

My Dad and I from this new feature:

Chr Start Location End Location Centimorgans (cM) SNPs
X 2,710,157 154,551,755 190.1 16,903

Chr 23

Mags

Roots Tech 2018

Roots Tech 2018 was another great event – the biggest event where WikiTree has a BIG presence! I counted 22 WikiTreers who came round for our Group photo on Friday. MANY, MANY more popped in and out of our great booth location over the entire conference and signed one of our Banners from Last year (thanks for the photo Erin Breen).

Location, Location, Location

Thanks to our tenure at Roots Tech and our industrious Forest Elf, Eowyn Langholf, we were one of the first booths to see when entering the Exhibit Hall. Literally, you came in the front door, looked to your left and saw a wall of Orange. What a great location this year.

Not once did I hear someone say they had trouble finding us or that they had to look very far. We were often the first stop on attendees day or two or three in the Exhibit Hall.

WikiTreers from near and far

The WikiTreers who came to man the booth, the Roots Tech Team, hailed from near and far. Aleš (and Family) win the distance contest – they traveled from Slovenia. The rest of us came from, England, Canada and the US. As best as my tired brain can count we had 15 Roots Tech Team members in attendence.

The Booth

We had a new booth format this year. In years past we spent a lot of time standing in and around the booth talking to people and running in to find a place to sit with visitors to share and explain WikiTree. This year we added a bit of a Bistro feel (no, no baristas, no latte’s – dang it). We had small tables and chairs set up and our WikiTreer’s showed up with plenty of laptops, Netbooks, Ipads and the like. We all spent time chatting with people, but a good bit of time was spent actually doing the thing we do, collaborating with the attendees and their limbs already on our great big ole shred tree!

I can’t tell you how great it felt to type in a Surname and have my booth guest squeal with glee that thier GGGwhatever was there looking back at them. Soon followed by another squeal when I revealed the DNA test connections of their ancestors, on their ancestor profiles! Being at Roots Tech is so rewarding on personal level.

Every year our booth is the booth for fun and enlightenment (of the Genealogical kind).

Roots Tech 2018 Conference Other Activites

There are other activities going on at the Conference and a few of us were able to take in some classes. We also spent time roaming around talking to people on the fly or posting Live FB Videos of happenings.  We got to meet a lot of new people and meet up with old friends.

I have more pictures to post but at the moment my fingers are refusing to type more…

Like impromptu WikiTree lunches and breakfasts and dinners and trips to the Family History Library, strolls through the pre-snow covered streets of Salt Lake City and  After Parties and Geneabloggers Tribe goings on, skiing at local resorts and…

Rest for now more for later…

70k Doc – First Connection

The last Blog Post was all about the 70k Document. It’s a Descendants of John Gaulding compilation document from a DNA connected (who is not connected to my Gauldings yet) cousin who is the keeper of a lifelong Gaulding researchers research. Up to speed? If not please read the, My Dad Has a Y DNA match to two Gauldings.

Making DNA Match Connections

I, personally, have DNA cousins and also people who should be DNA cousins, who are not a match to me, that I have wanted to connect for quite a while. The cousins who we think share a Gaulding MCRA (Most Common Recent Ancester) with me are of course the ones I want to connect first and especially the Y-DNA matches.

BUT, I have this friend and we have known for 3 or four years that we have the Gaulding Surname in our respective limbs of the Big Ole Shared Family Tree that is WikiTree. We have never been able to make that connection until…

You guessed it, the 70k Doc.

I know I should be tracking down those Y-DNA connections so I can confirm my fathers line back forever…

I couldn’t resist Liz and our shared wonder at the fact that we do not match via DNA. Yes, I am absolutely my fathers daughter and  he matches two other Gaulding Y-DNA testers. We are Gaulding’s for sure and according to the 70k Doc we share my fifth great grandfather, John Mathew Gaulding.

Why not a match?

Matching a MCRA at our 64, 4th great grandparents is about as far back as you can go with auDNA. Give or take a shake or two. Knowing Liz and I match further back than our 64, 4th Great Grandparents at our fifth makes a non-match a definite possibility.

The other factor might be that we didn’t inherit as much of the same DNA segment from our MCRA or that we didn’t inherit ANY matching segments of DNA from our MCRA. It’s the same as looking at a pair of siblings who have different color hair or eyes. I didn’t inherit the exact same things from our ancestors that my siblings did and it’s obvious when you look at us.

The Excitment of the Hunt

Over the past week or so, Liz and I have shot emails back and forth exploring names that might break down her brickwall. We finally did it a few days ago and couldn’t have done it without the 70k Doc. So this is revelation #1, Brickwall busting #1 and possibly pulled muscle #1 from Liz’s happy dance. Now we just need to verify all the genealogy we are looking at and we are done.

Now back to those two YDNA matches.

TEST Please!

To any male Gaulding, Gaulden, Gauldin, Golding, Goulding descendants, please test! In particular any descendant of John Gaulding of Verginia (any of them) or William Goulding of Bermuda. William names a nephew in his will, another William, who lived in New England. Be great to prove the theory that he was the father of John Gaulding of Virginia, imported by the Ripley Family.

My Dad has a Y-DNA match to two Gauldings.

My Dad has a Y-DNA match to two Gauldings. This means we can confirm our family connections back to our most common recent ancestor. The other two Y-DNA testers are from a branch of the family that haven’t been connected to the main trunk by anyone with published information.
 

Distant Cousins and Gaulding Researchers

Over the past years I have been talking to a very distant Gaulding cousin (a close relation to one of the Y-DNA testers) who has one such unpublished document. To make the family connections she agreed to share it with me. The document arrived as a 70K word rich text document converted to a Word document format. There is no consistent numbering schemes. It does not follow any genealogical numbering system nor is it chronological, skipping around from sibling to sibling in one generation then back to the generation before. The formatting, because of the conversion, has globs of spacing and the indents and lists are crazy.

Making It Make Sense

It’s taken me weeks of night and weekend work to get it into a format to print so I can look at it, make notes and correct the formatting, chronology, indents and lists systems. I started three nights ago with the meat of the document. The “How are we connected?” work of getting the siblings, parents, grandparents, great grandparents all lined up correctly so I can start the research and sourcing to make it right (the author did not include his sources either).
 
The author of this document (in an introduction to the document) makes no excuses, no apologies for the document format or lack of sources and rightly so since it is not intended to be published.
 
My hope is to get the document in good nick, genealogically wise, make the connections to confirm my dad and their dad’s DNA connection and to send the re-formatted document file back to the cousin who sent it to me. What a wonderful labor this is. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate her willingness to trust me with this researchers life work. As I work, I will fill in the missing pieces on WikiTree from his work so you can follow along there if you’d like.

Follow along if you’d like

I think our most common recent ancestor is, John Gaulding, St. Peter’s Parish, New Kent, Virginia, (abt. 1665-1740).
 

Would the REAL Martin Ebert Please Stand

Well in this case Martin Ebert can’t stand, either of them, at least not on their own. They need a little bit of help from genealogists. Maybe a a good sweep with a broom and then prop them up with the broom. Oh, we could go into all sorts of metaphors for this. But the truth? If people see something on the internet and copy and paste it willy-nilly without checking it’s validity, then the REAL Martin Eberts of the world will never be able to stand-up.

My Task

I have been given a task. To locate a marriage record for  Martin Ebert, b. 1780ishy who lived in Hull, Ottawa County, Quebec and died in Hastings, Ontario in 1783ish. Like how exact I am in those dates?

It appears that at some point someone connected a Martin Ebert who was born in York County, Pennsylvania – specifically his birth information – to Martin Ebert who lived and died in Quebec and Ontario.

It happens…a lot unfortunately.

I could say buyer beware. I could say if you wade into internet Genealogies you will find this quiet epidemic of copy and paste Measles. It is very contagious. What do you do about it? Read the information carefully and number one? Look for sources. Sources are the best inoculation.

Martin Ebert of Pennsylvania

Since I use, as most of you already know, WikiTree as my main Genealogy platform for my own family and for clients as well, I have been working on this task there. I was more than pleased to find that the Martin Ebert of Pennsylvania on WikiTree had NOT been connected to the Martin Ebert of Ontario on WikiTree. 

As I worked I noted information for Martin of Pennsylvania, and discovered he lived all of his life in Pennsylvania as witnessed by the many entries for him being involved as a sponsor for Baptisms from the Records of the First Moravian Church, City of York, York County, Pennsylvania, 1758-1800. Be hard for him to keep up this religous sponsorships while living full time in both places. This would be a BIG red flag for anyone trying to connect Martin of Ontario with Martin of York, Pennsylvania. It’s just logical.

Martin Ebert of Quebec and Ontario

Where was Martin of Quebec and Ontario born? No idea yet. When and where was he married? No idea yet.

Martin was born sometime between 1783 to 1790. This based on numerous bits and pieces from the internet and via some guesswork of how accurate Census Data is.

This Martin could have been born in New York State. There are a few Martin Ebert’s born about this time in New York State. To figure out which one fits this Martin we can look to the unsourced information for the marriage of this Martin Ebert to Roxanne Waller. Most of the Internet Genealogies point to Utica New York in 1808 or by Ebert researcher, Carol Hutchinson, in Hull, QC.

This Martin of Canada can not be the Martin Ebert, son of John Martin Ebert and Anna Maria Smyser born in Pennsylvania, John Martin Ebert. Martin Ebert who was born in York PA, married Mary Eichelberger, died in York, PA and is buried there. As we shown above.

Martin Ebert who married Roxanne Waller somehow took advantage of the 1792 proclamation of Governor Alured Clarke “of 1792, which threw the lands of Lower Canada open to such American settlers as were willing to declare allegiance to the British Crown. These migrations took the typical form in British North America of group settlements consisting of ‘leader and associates’….”

Along with Philemon Wright and his Laborers and workers,”…The core of the first group of settlers consisted of four other families and thirty-three labouring men, 1 1 unmarried farmers, from different parts of Massachusetts.” [1] What is the route these settlers took? If they swung across New York and Near Albany then, per Carol Hutchinsons theory, that he born somewhere near Albany, then it could be likely he joined this group as one of the workers and made his way with them to Hull.

Carol Hutchinson points to the First Account Books Philemon Wright as a source for knowing Martin Ebert was in Hull as early as 1806 as witnessed by his log entry into the account book.[2] Carol also lists him as living in Hull and being on the 1808 Militia Rolls – age of 24. “One is a militia list for Hull, Eardly and Onslow circa 1808. It lists Tiberius Wright and Philemon Wright as well as Eliad Waller, Eder Waller, (both sons of Truman Waller) and Martin Ebert as well as others for a total of 52.[3]

His Wife Roxanne Waller. Roxanne’s family headed by her father “Truman Waller, 43, from Marlborough Township and formerly of Granville, New York” traveled to Canada, August 1801, with a group of families with lead by Dudley Moore. [4] Considering Roxanne’s estimated birth date is 1790? She would have been ten year old when her family traveled to Canada. This helps to substantiate Carol Hutchinson’s idea that Martin and Roxanne were not married in Utica New York as Internet Genealogies pose.

If the Ebert Family was the Ebert Family of Albany, that Carol has posed in her research, they were not far away from the Waller family, 65 miles south, in Granville, Washington County. Did they Migrate together?

Carol Hutchinson poses that Martin Ebert could have left Hull during the War of 1812, which would explain the birth of his daughter Elizabeth Catherine in Utica, New York, in 1815. Carol also points to a Mertin Ebert who was a part of Colden’s 5th Artillery and Infantry Reg’t., New York Militia. [5]

That he lived and died in Quebec and Ontario is fairly well documented.

1825 Land Information

“At the Bristol Township Line sometime before 1825, an American by the name of Martin Ebert had squatted on the East half of Lot 11, Range 2, which borders on the River. This property had been improved by an American squatter living in Bristol by the name of Uzal Pearson. Ebert Bought these improvements in 1827.”[6]

1833 Land Grant

Name: Martin Eberts
Location: Clarendon, Pontiac
Acres: 100
Letters Patent Date: 1 Aug 1833[7]

1851 Census

1851 Census. [8]

 

Est. Birthdate of 1779.

1861 Census

1861 Census.[9]

Est. Birthdate of 1780.

Find-A-Grave: Memorial #77246563 His tombstone lists his dates as 1780-1873. According to Bob Sturgeon on Ancestry Message boards from 2001, “we now have an actual marker on his gravesite”. This grave marker was set in modern times and unfortunately may be carrying some of the internet misattribution with it.

Research Notes

1859 Fonds Cour Supérieure. Greffes de notaires

“Acquit and Discharge, Hector Russell to Martin Eberts”[10]

1842 Fonds Cour Supérieure. Greffes de notaires

Martin Ebert
Record Date: 12 févr. 1842 (12 Feb 1842)
Record Place: Terrebonne, Québec (Quebec), Canada
Notary: Louis-Edouard Globensky
Notarial Act Number: 2766
Record Type: Vente (Sale)
Record Description: Vente
Participants: Martin Ebert and Stanislas Linssico[11]

Other interesting Eberts

A Marin Ebert was born in 1788 in New York.
A Martin Ebert Born in NY in 1783. “Martin Ebert died 1873 in Bangor, Hastings, Ontario, Carol H., 2011
John Ebert, Census 1790, Rensselaerville, Albany, New York, United States[12]
John Ebert, Census 1800, Berne, Albany, New York, United States[13]
Derrick Ebert, Census 1830, Watervliet, Albany, New York, United States[14]

Places To look for Martin and Roxanne and the illusive Marriage Record.

  • Granville, NY
  • Marlboro Township, UpperCanada
  • Albany, NY
  • Augusta, Ontario
  • Sattlers to Early Ottawa/Eardley
  • Settlement of Hastings – Bangor
  • Look for all state possibilities for Ebert Family.

    The DNA

    Of course there is DNA involved – I am all about DNA! Martin’s Descendant has done DNA testing with AncestryDNA.com and shared her DNA on GEDmatch (GEDmatch enables the sharing of DNA match information across all the testing companies). Ancestry created a DNA circle connecting  others to Martin and Roxy. Unfortunately so far all the other matches reach Martin and Roxy through the same child. While my Martin Ebert Descendant reaches Martin and Roxy through a different child. What I would love to see pop-up are some testers from another direct line from Martin and Roxy. I would love to see a Marriage Record float down from the sky <I have Dreams>.

In a perfect DNA world I would also like to see DNA information from some of Martin Ebert of Pennsylvania’s Descendants. Ebert may sound like a unique surname to you but to me? After working this line for some time? They could be smiths for all the Eberts I am finding in the Canada and the United States North Eastern States

Sources

  1.  “The Famous Township of Hull”: Image and Aspirations of a Pioneer Quebec Community, p. 341, by Bruce S. Elliott, prepared for a seminar in social history at Carleton University.[1]
  2.  The Family History and Account Books of Philemon Wright, By Diane Proctor, BIFHSGO. Link given but it is not working.
  3.  Martin Ebert Died 1873 in Bangor, Hastings, Ontario, By Carol Hutchinson, 2011.[2] and Bob Moody
  4.  “The Famous Township of Hull”: Image and Aspirations of a Pioneer Quebec Community, p. 341, by Bruce S. Elliott, prepared for a seminar in social history at Carleton University.[3] via Thad. W.H. LEAVITT, History of Leeds and Grenville (Belleville: Mika Silk, Screening Limited, 1972), p. 133; United Church Archives, Toronto, Methodist Church in Hull, L. Canada, Baptismal Register, 182~1843, Micro. D.3.5.86
  5.  War of 1812 Service Records, National Archives and Records Administration, Compiled Military Service records for the Volunteer Soldiers who served during the war of 1812, Washington DC, NARA M602, 234 Rolls
  6.  Clarendon and Shawville, p. 21, by J. Loyd Armstrong, Dickson Enterprises, 1980. Ottawa Room, Ottawa Public Library. Call 971.4215 A736.
  7.  Letters Patent Book: N Grants; Page: 179; County Index Volume: 1; Page: 830, Robert Dunn and Derek Hopkins, comp. Alphabetical Index to the Land Grants by the Crown in the province of Quebec from 1763 to 31st December 1890. Pointe Claire, Quebec: Quebec Family History Society, 2005. Ancestry.com.[4]
  8.  Census of 1851 (Canada East, Canada West, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia). Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Canada. Census of Nova Scotia, 1851. Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada: Nova Scotia Archives and Records Management (NSARM): Nova Scotia Board of Statistics, 1851.
  9.  1861 Census of Canada for Martin Ebert, Litchfield, Canada East, Pontiac, “Census returns for 1861.” LAC microfilm C-999 to C-1007, C-1010 to C-1093, C-1095 to C-1108, C-1232 to C-1331, M-1165 to M-1166, M-1168 to M-1171, M-556, M-874 to M-878, M-880 to M-886, M-896 to M-900. Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa.
  10.  Fonds Cour Supérieure. Greffes de notaires. Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Quebec, Canada, Notarial Records, 1637-1935 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.[5]
  11.  Fonds Cour Supérieure. Greffes de notaires. Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Quebec, Canada, Notarial Records, 1637-1935 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.Image
  12.  “United States Census, 1790,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHKG-149 : accessed 7 January 2018), John Ebert, Rensselaerville, Albany, New York, United States; citing p. 193, NARA microfilm publication M637, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 6; FHL microfilm 568,146.
  13.  “United States Census, 1800,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHRC-P6H : accessed 7 January 2018), John Ebert, Berne, Albany, New York, United States; citing p. 68, NARA microfilm publication M32, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 22; FHL microfilm 193,710.
  14.  “United States Census, 1830,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHG1-L7Y : 29 July 2017), Derick Ebert, Watervliet, Albany, New York, United States; citing 462, NARA microfilm publication M19, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 84; FHL microfilm 17,144.

2017 International Conference on Genetic Genealogy

Grandma’s Genes will be present and accounted for at the i4gg conference this weekend in San Diego. Two days of networking and talking and presentations and…

From the website for i4gg: “The DNA Detectives brings back i4GG 2017 in SAN DIEGO CA December 9 and 10, 2017, 9am to 6pm. The event will cover traditional Genetic Genealogy as well as Genetic Genealogy methodologies for unknown parentage. Newbie or expert, this is a great opportunity to learn from the cream of the crop. The event will be held at Sheraton Mission Valley San Diego Hotel 1433 Camino Del Rio South, San Diego, CA. 92108 December 09 – 10, 2017.”

See you there!