DNA confirmation Citations

You can say you have proved a connection via paperwork and sources and most all of us know how to post a citation for that proof. But what do you do when you finally prove your paper trail (or lack thereof) of sources? How do you post a DNA confirmation citation?

I got a kick in the bum (completely unintentionally) from one of my heros, DNA expert extraordinaire, Peter Roberts.  I was doing the things I do on Wikitree (where I post all of my ongoing – it never ends does it? – research) and noticed Peter working with a profile and DNA triangulation.  As a part of what he had done we had a short email exchange about DNA confirmation and why it’s important to cite the DNA confirmation in the child’s information.

The kick in the bum made me go back and figure out how to add my DNA citations!

So for example, my grandmother’s DNA has been proven using a method called triangulation (basically I have found two other people who match my DNA, through testing, our segments match location on the same chromosome and our genealogical research sync’s-up as well). I am using atDNA (autosomal) with 4th cousins.  But how on earth do I cite this? I went to the DNA Confirmation Help Page on WikiTree and looked it up!

The citation ended up looking like this:

  1.  Maternal relationship is confirmed by a triangulated group consisting of M. Gaulden GEDmatch #,  Bubbette Blue GEDmatch # and Bubba Jones GEDmatch # sharing a 26.7 cM segment on chromosome 9 from 103,348,186 to 123,946,544

Roots Tech 2016 or Bust

My Travel
I am a day away from my day long, continent spanning trip to reach the Salt Palace in Salt Lake City, Utah. I leave at quarter to 10am EST and arrive at quarter to 10pm MST. So technically it will look like 12 hours, but in reality, it will be more.

On the way I get to meet a childhood friend in LA for lunch, and on the way home I get to play in Vegas with a WikiTree colleague. No, I didn’t plan it that way but when I realized I would be in LA for a good chunk of time and in Vegas for an even bigger chunk of time? Well things just fell into place. Then, because I am flying West Jet home from Vegas, I will be able to watch, for free, from the back of the seat in front of me, the Super Bowl. Go Bron..Pan..oh how do you choose? Peyton Manning’s probable final game/Super Bowl appearance, or, roll Panthers after one incredible season?

The Conference
I will be at the WikiTree booth, sporting my burnt orange with pride, giving out as many hugs as I can, while taking selfies with anyone who will take one with me AND posing for pictures with some of my favorite WikiTreers in WikiTree’s photo booth!

I will try to sneak in some classes in betwixt and between talking to every single person attending Roots Tech, about how incredible WikiTree has been for my Genealogical journey.

I will also tell anyone who will listen about how excited I am to have teamed-up with Marc Snelling to start Grandmas Genes and how much fun I am already having working on blogging, Tweeting, Facebooking as Grandmas Genes…I am becoming a social media Maven.

See you at Roots Tech!

Why DNA?

Oh, there are so many reasons why DNA.

DNA is the thread that makes up the fabric of who we are. It is also the tint in our Iris, the gray (what, you aren’t grey yet?) of our hair, the knock of our knees, the recipe of our self. It is also the road map of our ancestry.

I have, according to Doodle my Grandmother, my grandfather Gaulden’s hair and eyes. I can see in the mirror that I have my mothers smile. All of my siblings and I have the same basic build, in varying degrees, of our grandfather TC. One sibling has curly brown hair and resembles, again according to Doodle, Doodle’s mother Allie Compton. The other sibling is some kind of incredible replica of TC. I know that I see my sibling in the face and expressions of my niece. I also see the same niece in the face of second cousin. All our family traits, everything is inherited and that inheritance is decided by our DNA.

DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is the carrier of our genetic (origins, the study of heredity) information. It is “a chemical consisting of a sequence of hundreds of millions of nucleotides found in the nuclei of cells containing the genetic information about an individual. It is shaped like a double-stranded helix, which consists of two paired DNA molecules and resembles a ladder that has been twisted. The “rungs” of the ladder are made of base pairs, or nucleotides with complementary hydrogen bonding patterns.”[1]

So in the simplest form DNA is hundreds of millions of very small things found in a cell – each cell in our bodies. How these tiny things are are set-up is how our body knows how to be. This is the basic thing to know.

We inherit parts of us from our mothers and our fathers. We also inherit parts of us from our grandparents and their parents and their parents and…HOW we inherit it is much harder to explain.

If we all inherited things only from each of our parents then we would all look just like our parents and each of our siblings. But as I discussed above, I don’t look just like my brother or my sister. I don’t look just like my father or my mother. I don’t look just like any of my grandparents. I look just like a random combination of all of, or parts of, different ancestors from the beginning of my family line(s).

So, I can ask my family questions and find out about my family history. I can be told I have my grandfathers eyes…wow I must have inherited them from him…but who did he inherit them from? Well, no one is alive today to tell me that. No one is alive to tell me who his father was from first hand experience either. I can go to the Library, County Archives, State or Provincial Archives and the National Archives and find the paper trail. The paper trail may or may not tell me anything further back than what the papers cover, but how can I find out about the rest of the story.

Technically a DNA test won’t tell me who I got my eyes from, but it can tell me that I have blue eyes based on what my DNA test says. A DNA test can also tell me that my mother is my mother (despite how many times my sister told me I was adopted), that my grandmother is my grandmother and that her great, great, grandmother is really her 2xgreatgrandmother. To connect the DNA with the paper trail, to prove that trail, is basically the found holy grail of our family history.

That is why DNA.

Related Posts

Who to Test?
Where to Test?
Understanding your Ethnic Results

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1.↑ http://isogg.org/wiki/Genetics_Glossary

 

 

Just Start

Oh to Start. Well that is what it all comes down to right? Nothing gets done unless you just start. Marc and I are doing just that.

We have known each other for a couple of years. He and I live in the same neighborhood. His sister is in my life “circle’s”. You know, those people you probably interact with at least weekly, but they aren’t really a “friend”. A neighbor who shares a fence, the fella at the butchershop you end up having long discussions with occasionally while shopping, the manager at your favorite store who patiently listened to a special request, made it happen and you always go out of your way to say hello.

So one afternoon when our paths crossed, Marc says to me, I hear you are into “Genealogy”. Oh, the conversation that followed. So now we…

…Just Start.